Katarina Janeckova Walshe

Secrets of a Happy Household

15.01.2021 – 26.03.2021

EN DE

The gallery is reopening Tuesday, 9 March, currently by appointment only. We look forward welcoming you 7 days a week 11 AM – 6 PM.

Please click here, call, or email us at +49 30 24 34 24 62 or info@dittrich-schlechtriem.com to schedule your appointment.

DITTRICH & SCHLECHTRIEM is pleased to present SECRETS OF A HAPPY HOUSEHOLD, the first solo show with the gallery in Berlin by KATARINA JANECKOVA WALSHE (b. 1988 in Bratislava, Slovakia / lives and works in Corpus Christi, Texas, USA). The exhibition features large-scale oil and acrylic paintings on canvas as well as a series of works on paper and writings. Janeckova Walshe documents her life in various portraits and depictions of human and animal figures cast in mundane yet provocative scenarios, with titles that are as fittingly descriptive as they are fraught such as Dishwashing In Texas III, Marriage Is a Choice, and What Did You Do All Day Baby?. Expressive compositions of cowboys and bears or domestic interiors and scenes from intimate relationships are paired with self-portraits navigating open or obstacle-filled Texan landscapes, altogether conveying a blend of unvarnished truth and psychological fantasy.

Janeckova Walshe’s sophisticated, albeit stylistically varied approach and substitution of human and animal forms lends itself to a kind of hypnagogic and allegorical reading. Representing familiar scenes and informed by selected facets of her own life, her works articulate a larger narrative on identity, femininity, and the complexities of power. While purposeful and narrative, the imagery gives the viewer space to reflect on their own personal history and step into the shoes of the posed figures in order to process these archetypal embodiments of various identities.

For all their suppleness, Janeckova Walshe’s female figures are vigorous and muscular, their ministrations suffused with courage and humor. The visual idiom devised by the artist—who took up bodybuilding to steel herself for the physical strains of painting and motherhood—unlocks a dimension of the role of partner and mother that has been eclipsed by male fantasies of self-sacrificing maternal meekness: the strength and life-sustaining function of love and the work of caring that one body performs in the service of another in the family, under one roof, in one household.

It is a play with female desire that bears fantastic fruit yet is rooted in the body. The sex it renders is not pornographic, on the contrary: it eschews depiction in favor of the lightness of movement and a love for the figures’ becoming-flesh in their togetherness. Yet with all this good cheer, the ground from which it grows and the shadow the body casts on it are not absent from the picture: some of the great questions in feminist literature and theory concern the uses of a culturally informed sexual desire that is haunted by fantasies of submission, by the allure of the idea of being overpowered and protected, and the question of how all that is compatible with a self-determined life and with securing the space in which one’s own imaginary, an artistic oeuvre that does not shy away from such contradictions, can take root and flourish.

Die Galerie wird am Dienstag, den 9. März, wieder geöffnet, derzeit nur nach Vereinbarung. Wir freuen uns, Sie 7 Tage die Woche von 11 bis 18 Uhr begrüßen zu dürfen.

Bitte klicken Sie hier, rufen Sie uns an unter +49 30 24 34 24 62 oder senden Sie eine E-Mail an info@dittrich-schlechtriem.com, um einen Termin zu vereinbaren.

DITTRICH & SCHLECHTRIEM freuen sich, SECRETS OF A HAPPY HOUSEHOLD, die erste Einzelausstellung von KATARINA JANECKOVA WALSHE (geb. Bratislava, Slowakei, 1988 / lebt und arbeitet in Corpus Christi, Texas, USA) in Berlin, vorzustellen. Die Galerie zeigt großformatige Bilder in Öl und Acryl auf Leinwand sowie eine Reihe von Arbeiten und Papier und Texte. Janeckova Walshe dokumentiert ihr eigenes Leben in Porträts und Darstellungen von menschlichen und Tiergestalten in alltäglichen und doch provokanten Szenarien; die Titel sind so treffend wie aufgeladen: Dishwashing In Texas III, Marriage Is a Choice oder What Did You Do All Day Baby?. Ausdrucksstarke Kompositionen mit Cowboys und Bären oder häusliche Interieurs und Szenen intimer Zuwendung stehen neben Selbstporträts, in denen die Künstlerin sich in offenen oder mit Hindernissen übersäten texanischen Landschaften bewegt; ungeschminkte Wahrheit mischt sich mit psychologischer Fantasie.

Mit ihrer anspruchsvollen, dabei stilistisch abwechslungsreichen Technik und der Ersetzung von Tier- für Menschenfiguren lesen Janeckova Walshes Arbeiten sich wie allegorische Halluzinationen. Vertraute Szenen und ausgewählte Facetten ihres eigenen Alltags verdichten sich zu einer Erzählung von Identität, Weiblichkeit und verwickelten Machtverhältnissen. Die bewusst gesetzte narrative Bildlichkeit lässt dem Betrachter dennoch Raum für ein Nachdenken über seine eigene persönliche Geschichte und archetypische Verkörperungen verschiedener Identitäten.

Janeckova Walshes Frauenfiguren sind bei all ihrer Weichheit kraftvoll und muskulös und ihre Zuwendungen voller Mut und Humor. Die Bildsprache der Künstlerin, die selbst begann, Bodybuilding zu betreiben, um die körperliche Arbeit des Malens und der Mutterschaft besser bewältigen zu können, öffnet eine Dimension der Partner- und Mutterrolle, die in den Männerfantasien aufopfernden mütterlichen Sanftmuts verdrängt worden ist: die Stärke und die lebenserhaltende Funktion der Liebe und der Care-Arbeit des einen Körpers hin zum anderen, in einer Familie, unter einem Dach, in einem Haushalt.

Es ist ein Spiel mit dem weiblichen Begehren, das im Fantastischen aufgeht und doch im Körperlichen wurzelt. Der dargestellte Sex ist nicht pornografisch, im Gegenteil: Er verzichtet auf die Abbildung zugunsten der Leichtigkeit der Bewegung und einer Liebe zum Fleischwerden der Figuren in ihrem Miteinander. Doch fehlt bei all der Fröhlichkeit nicht der Boden, auf dem sie wächst, und der Schatten, den der Körper auf ihn wirft: Einige der großen Fragen feministischer Literatur und Theorie sind der Umgang mit dem kulturell gewachsenen sexuellen Begehren, das heimgesucht wird von Fantasien der eigenen Unterwerfung, von der Anziehungskraft des Überwältigt- und Beschütztwerdens, und die nach der Vereinbarkeit all dessen mit einem selbstbestimmten Leben und der Sicherung desjenigen Raums, der das eigene Imaginäre, das künstlerische Schaffen inmitten dieser Widersprüche etabliert und aufblühen lässt.

The exhibition’s title, Secrets of a Happy Household, addresses this parable of the domestic struggle for survival with a wink and a nod: the misogynistic phantasm of the Stepford Wife, the creepy homemaker who, with soldierly determination, dedicates her life to maintaining a façade that is an indispensable prerequisite for the subjugation of her own body, is dismantled by the artist’s wit.

The above is an excerpt from the essay Living with the Beast, contributed by Anna Gien for the exhibition catalogue, which will be available at the gallery in January 2021. For further information on the artist and the works or to request images, please contact Owen Clements, owen(at)dittrich-schlechtriem.com.

Der Titel der Ausstellung Secrets of a Happy Household thematisiert diese Parabel des häuslichen Überlebens-kampfs mit einem Augenzwinkern: das misogyne Fantasma der Stepford Wives, der unheimlichen, soldatischen Hausfrauen, deren Lebenswerk die Aufrechterhaltung einer Fassade ist, welche die Unterwerfung ihres eigenen Körpers erst möglich macht, wird hier humorvoll aufgelöst.

Dieser Auszug stammt aus Anna Giens Essay Das Tier in meinem Haus im Katalog zur Ausstellung, der im Januar 2021 über die Galerie erhältlich sein wird. Für weitere Informationen zur Künstlerin und den Werken oder um Bildmaterial anzufordern, wenden Sie sich bitte an Owen Clements, owen(at)dittrich-schlechtriem.com.

essay

EN DE
LIVING WITH THE BEAST
By ANNA GIEN

Published in 1837, the English poet Robert Southey’s fairy tale The Story of the Three Bears tells of a woman who enters the forest home of three bears. The woman—Southey paints her as an old, dirty, impudent vagabond—uses the opportunity presented by the bears’ absence to eat their porridge, breaks the furniture, and takes a nap in one of their freshly made beds; when the bears discover her, she jumps from the window and escapes. The tale would later become world-famous under the title Goldilocks and the Three Bears, but by then one important detail had changed—the uncouth old woman had been transformed over the years into a girl with golden tresses who becomes fast friends with the bears and moves in with them.

Born in Bratislava in 1988, Katarina Janeckova Walshe grew up in the city, far from forests, wild beasts, and the raw quality that distinguishes life in the countryside from urban existence. She was only in her mid-twenties when, having graduated from art school, she moved halfway around the globe to a place that, in some sense, might be called the end of the world: Corpus Christi, Texas. A name full of promise or foreboding, bringing to mind the remote desert in which somber American stories of heroism are set, and although there is nothing ominous about the unprepossessing seaport in the south of Texas, where the painter now lives with her child and her husband, a Texan entrepreneur, it is certainly a challenging environment in every respect for a young European woman artist: surrounded by arid landscapes and the ghostly symbols of historic patriarchal hegemonies, amid people who lead inscrutable lives between cowboy boots and giant trucks, she decides to make a home for her work.

DAS TIER IN MEINEM HAUS
Von ANNA GIEN

The Story of the Three Bears ist ein 1837 erschienenes Märchen des englischen Dichters Robert Southey. Es erzählt die Geschichte einer Frau, die auf einem Spaziergang durch den Wald in das Haus dreier Bären eindringt. Die Frau, die von Southey als alte, schmutzige und unverschämte Vagabundin beschrieben wird, isst in der Abwesenheit der Bären deren Brei auf, zerbricht das Mobiliar und legt sich in eines der frisch gemachten Betten, wo sie schließlich von den Bären entdeckt wird, aus dem Fenster springt und flieht. Die Geschichte sollte später unter Namen Goldlöckchen und die drei Bären weltberühmt werden, doch unter Veränderung eines wichtigen Details – denn mit den Jahren wurde aus der alten, ungehobelten Frau ein junges, goldgelocktes Mädchen, das Freundschaft mit den Bären schließt und beginnt, mit ihnen zu leben.

Katarina Janeckova Walshe wurde 1988 in Bratislava geboren. Sie wuchs in der Stadt auf, fernab von Wäldern, Wildtieren und der Rohheit, die dem Leben auf dem Land auf ganz andere Weise anhaftet als einer städtischen Existenz. Sie war erst Mitte zwanzig, als sie nach Abschluss des Kunststudiums fortzog, an einen Ort, den man unter gewissen Umständen als das Ende der Welt bezeichnen könnte: Corpus Christi in Texas. Ein verheißungsvoller Name, der an die entlegenen Wüstenstriche düsterer amerikanischer Heldengeschichten erinnert, und obwohl die einfache Hafenstadt im Süden von Texas, in der die Malerin heute mit ihrem Kind und ihrem Mann, einem texanischen Unternehmer, lebt, nichts Unheilvolles hat, ist sie für eine junge europäische Künstlerin in jeder Hinsicht eine Herausforderung: Umgeben von Trockenheit und geisterhaften Symbolen historischer patriarchaler Hegemonien, in der die Menschen zwischen Cowboystiefeln und Riesentrucks ein rätselhaftes Leben führen, beschließt sie, ihrer Arbeit eine Heimat zu geben.

The first thing that strikes the beholder’s eye is the uncommon familiarity and warmth of her pictures. There is none of the desolation of the Texan desert in them, no loneliness, no frigid wind. Dishwashing in Texas II is a wild scene—the colors bold and agitated—showing a perfectly ordinary action cast as unexpectedly dense phantasmagoria: a female figure stands before the sink in a kitchen doing dishes, and her labor, it seems, is the source of a dynamic that sets everything in motion—the plates, the colors of the wallpaper, and the shower of petals originating in the vase on the countertop and drifting even over the painted frame within the picture. Only the central protagonist, the woman, stark naked, tall and of what appears to be imperturbable beauty, maintains a composure that speaks from the eye with which, looking over her shoulder, she fixes the beholder. The painter captures, and toys with, the implicit position of the gaze, the blind spot of the female body that is the object of contemplation, by dint of a precise inversion: the picture at first comes across as a feisty self-portrait—the figure’s glance is ever so slightly from above, letting her look down on the beholder with an air of sangfroid, taking possession of her nakedness without needing to justify it. It is upon closer inspection that one glimpses an almost invisible detail in the background, a shadow, the dark silhouette of a bear, a saturnine suitor holding a bouquet of roses in his hand. And only then does the beholder realize that the gaze that frames the figure is neither her own nor the painter’s upon her self-portrait but that of the bear, standing in the door behind her, its reflection discernible, as though it were our own, in the windowpanes.

The fairy tale of the woman and the bear, which lives on to this day in children’s stories and fantasy novels, is old, preserving the imprint of an enigmatic encounter between human and animal, which, as in Southey’s narrative, often suggests an uneasy blend of the uncanniness of our own bodily existence and sexual temptation: the “beast bridegroom,” the prince masquerading as a kind bear, the wolf skulking his prey disguised as the lover or a relative, is a key figure in myths and fairy tales, in totemic and shamanic legends. Many of them are fables of horror meant to deter the listener with obscure messages from a history of sexualized violence, which Janeckova Walshe here visualizes through the intensity of the gaze on the female body.

The dance with the bear posing now as a tame gallant, now as a self-ironic lover boy is not at odds with the optimistic and dynamic world of female dominance limning its own portrait between snakes and cactuses in assured and frank poses, in florid physicality and effervescent chromatic euphoria: Quarantine Haircuts and Trust features two nudes during a haircut, standing so closely together that they might almost be a single imposing figure seen from behind. The female character, scissors in hand, has placed one foot on the stool on which the male is sitting and partially masks the latter’s body despite its physical superiority, its conspicuous size. The same prodigious strength that pervades so many of the pictures in this instance yields a scene of loving castration: Delilah’s cutting of Samson’s hair, which turns into an intimate encounter sustained by trust, establishing a superiority rooted above all in affectionate attention. For all their suppleness, Janeckova Walshe’s female figures are vigorous and muscular, their ministrations suffused with courage and humor. The visual idiom devised by the artist—who took up bodybuilding to steel herself for the physical strains of painting and motherhood—unlocks a dimension of the role of partner and mother that has been eclipsed by male fantasies of self-sacrificing maternal meekness: the strength and life-sustaining function of love and the work of caring that one body performs in the service of another in the family, under one roof, in one household. The house, in these works, is a place filled with love, but also an archaic one; a scene of intimacy, but also of existential ties binding the individual to its shelter: the unconscious, the animal dimension of all familial community.

The exhibition’s title, Secrets of a Happy Household, addresses this parable of the domestic struggle for survival with a wink and a nod: the misogynistic phantasm of the Stepford Wife, the creepy homemaker who, with soldierly determination, dedicates her life to maintaining a façade that is an in-dispensable prerequisite for the subjugation of her own body, is dismantled by the artist’s wit—the Sunday roast and cake supplanted on the platter by a phallus-bearing bear, the totemic rudiment of fantasies of female power served as a thoroughly civilized meal to be carved up and consumed by redmanicured fingernails wielding knife and fork. These archetypal scenes outline a world in which physicality is present; not smoldering between Reddi-Whip and glazed spareribs but right there, in the intimate and solicitous and even pleasurable connivance with figures and things. The bears in all their furry opulence metamorphose into amicable sexual fantasies, benevolent household spirits that become part of the family, turning regiments of affectionate care and the distribution of domestic chores upside down and demonstrating their talents as nurturing and entertaining providers to the female figures. They offer foot massages and the proverbial bear hugs or, on other occasions, wait behind the curtain, unobtrusive spectators to the caresses the woman exchanges with a human lover.

It is a play with female desire that bears fantastic fruit yet is rooted in the body. The sex it renders is not pornographic, on the contrary: it eschews depiction in favor of the lightness of movement and a love for the figures’ becoming-flesh in their togetherness. Yet with all this good cheer, the ground from which it grows and the shadow the body casts on it are not absent from the picture: some of the great questions in feminist literature and theory concern the uses of a culturally informed sexual desire that is haunted by fantasies of submission, by the allure of the idea of being overpowered and protected, and the question of how all that is compatible with a self-determined life and with securing the space in which one’s own imaginary, an artistic oeuvre that does not shy away from such contradictions, can take root and flourish.

Like the ursine suitor in Janeckova Walshe’s works, the plot of the woman learning to live with the bears, as in Southey’s fairy tale, reveals a blind spot that suggests the question of a woman’s life and survival in a patriarchal world: when she is affable, pretty, and well-groomed, the bears allow her to stay with them and make friends with her, whereas the angry old woman is harshly roused from her slumber and chased out into the forest. In Texas, this ostensible paradox of affection and utter subjection is reflected in the strange closeness between humans and beasts: the cowboy’s livelihood is dependent on his cattle’s being killed. Not by coincidence, the drover dressed in the flayed hides of the animals under his care stands as a symbol of North America’s history of violence, of the colonization, forced displacement, and murder of its indigenous peoples. In Iron Man, he now appears in a crucifixion scene, naked save for his hat, an erotic domestic hired not to slaughter but to: iron. Just as the threat of punishment hovering over anyone daring to rebel against a living environment whose rules are made by others is encoded in The Story of the Three Bears, Janeckova Walshe’s magical realism of domesticity is laced with menace; yet she so emphatically shrouds her figures in that menace that it envelops them as a source of comfort.

Janeckova Walshe’s visual idiom is animated by a play with the dark sides of an unconscious intimacy that is shared by all that lives and derives from it something that, dazzled by the ostensible levity of her work, one might not at first glance give her credit for: an existentialist position—though not the one staked out by the twentieth century’s stories of heroism, enacted by lonesome cowboys and Indians roaming the prairies, in which survival is painted as a matter of bloody battle waged against the others. In Janeckova Walshe’s work, survival is born of a female imaginary, of the psychological verity of everyday routines, the familial setting and its colorful fleshly reality, which raises in fresh form the ever more urgent question of the possibility of human existence on earth: how do we survive in close proximity to others?

One indispensable part of survival is shaping the habitat, transforming it into a congenial and welcoming environment. In Corpus Christi, Katarina Janeckova Walshe has created a space that is more than a home. It is the magical stuff of her work that pervades everything here: even the bears venture out from the pictures on tiptoe, populating not just the family’s property but the surrounding neighborhood, perching on fences and patronizing little shops. It is a life’s work that has fashioned a diverse world sustained by the body in surroundings studded with symbols of hegemony and dominance. And to hear Janeckova Walshe talk about her work is to sense, beneath her serenity and affability, her resolve and her consciousness that one must speak the language of the circumstances that inflict violence on one’s own life in order to vanquish them. Still, she does not chase the bears from her house; on the contrary, she conjures them, in a cheerful and heroic history of the utterly mundane.

ANNA GIEN, born 1991 in Munich, writes prose, essays and poetry as well a monthly column. Her work revolves around feminist theory, the pornographical body and the relations of violence and visibility. 2019 her debut novel „M“ was published by Matthes und Seitz Berlin. It’s adaption for theater will premiere at Schaubühne Berlin 2021. She lives and works in Berlin.

Das Erste, das der Betrachterin ins Auge fällt, ist die ungewöhnliche Vertrautheit und Wärme der Bilder. Es ist keine Trostlosigkeit der texanischen Wüste in ihnen zu finden, keine Einsamkeit und keine Kälte. Dishwashing in Texas II ist eine wilde Szene – die Farben intensiv und bewegt –, die ein ganz alltägliches Geschehen in einer überraschend verdichteten Fantasmatik zeigt: Eine Frauenfigur steht vor einer Küchenanrichte, wo sie Geschirr spült, und alles, so scheint es, ist hier ausgehend von dieser Arbeit in Bewegung – die Teller, die Farbgebung der Tapete und der Blütenregen, der von der Vase auf der Anrichte aus sogar noch die bildeigene Rahmung überfliegt. Bloß die Hauptfigur des Bilds, die Frau, die nackt, groß und von einer unerschütterlich wirkenden Schönheit ist, bewahrt die Fassung der ganzen Szene in dem Blick, den sie über ihre Schulter hinweg an die Betrachterin richtet. Die Malerin fängt und spielt hier mit der impliziten Position des gaze, des toten Winkels des Angesehen-Werdens des weiblichen Körpers, durch eine präzise Umkehrung: Zunächst vermittelt das Bild den Eindruck eines mutigen Selbstporträts – der Blick der Figur ist leicht nach oben gesetzt, sodass sie gelassen zur Betrachterin hinabsieht, ihre Nacktheit damit für sich gewinnt, ohne sie noch verteidigen zu müssen. Doch erst auf den zweiten Blick, fast unsichtbar, zeigt sich im Hintergrund des Bilds ein Schatten. Es ist der dunkle Umriss eines Bärs, eines düsteren Kavaliers mit einem Strauß Rosen in der Hand, und erst in diesem Moment erkennt die Betrachterin, dass der Blick, der auf die Figur fällt, nicht ihr eigener und nicht der der Malerin auf ihr Selbstporträt ist, sondern der des Bären, der hinter ihr in der Tür steht und dessen Spiegelung wir, als wäre es unsere eigene, in den Fensterscheiben sehen können.

Das Märchen von der Frau und dem Bären, das bis heute in Kindergeschichten und Fantasy-Romanen fortlebt, ist alt und trägt die Spuren einer rätselhaften Begegnung zwischen Mensch und Tier in sich, die wie in Southeys Erzählung oft zwischen dem Unheimlichen der eigenen Körperlichkeit und der Sexualität changiert: Als „Tierbräutigam“ spielt der Prinz, der sich im Gewand eines lieben Bären verbirgt, oder der Wolf, der in der Verkleidung des Geliebten oder der Verwandten auf seine Beute lauert, eine Schlüsselrolle in Sagen und Märchen, in totemistischen und schamanischen Legenden. Oft sind es Schreckfabeln, die verdunkelte Botschaften einer Geschichte sexualisierter Gewalt enthalten, die Janeckova Walshe hier über die Intensität des Blicks auf den weiblichen Körper ins Bild setzt.

Der Tanz mit dem Bär, der sich mal in einen zahmen Verehrer, mal in einen selbstironischen Loverboy verwandelt, steht nicht im Widerspruch zu der optimistischen und energischen Welt weiblicher Dominanz, die sich zwischen Schlangen und Kakteen in sicheren, offenen Posen, in blühender Körperlichkeit und sprudelnder farblicher Euphorie zeichnet: In Quarantine Haircuts and Trust sind zwei Akte während eines Haarschnitts zu sehen, die so eng zusammenstehen, dass sie beinahe wie eine einzige imposante Rückenfigur wirken. Die weibliche Figur mit der Schere in der Hand hat einen Fuß auf den Hocker gestellt, auf dem die männliche Figur sitzt, und überlagert diese trotz ihrer körperlichen Überlegenheit, ihrer sichtbaren Größe. Dieselbe verwunderliche Stärke, die so viele der Bilder durchzieht, geht hier in einer liebevollen Kastrationsszene auf: der Haarschnitt Samsons durch Delila, der zu einer intimen Begegnung des Vertrauens wird und eine Überlegenheit schafft, die vor allem in Zuwendung und Wärme wurzelt. Janeckova Walshes Frauenfiguren sind bei all ihrer Weichheit kraftvoll und muskulös und ihre Zuwendungen voller Mut und Humor. Die Bildsprache der Künstlerin, die selbst begann, Bodybuilding zu betreiben, um die körperliche Arbeit des Malens und der Mutterschaft besser bewältigen zu können, öffnet eine Dimension der Partner- und Mutterrolle, die in den Männerfantasien aufopfernden mütterlichen Sanftmuts verdrängt worden ist: die Stärke und die lebenserhaltende Funktion der Liebe und der Care-Arbeit des einen Körpers hin zum anderen, in einer Familie, unter einem Dach, in einem Haushalt. Das Haus ist hier ein liebevoller und zugleich archaischer Ort, ein Ort der Intimität, aber auch der existentiellen Gebundenheit an seinen Schutz: die unbewusste tierische Dimension eines jeden häuslichen Zusammenlebens.

Der Titel der Ausstellung Secrets of a Happy Household thematisiert diese Parabel des häuslichen Überlebenskampfs mit einem Augenzwinkern: das misogyne Fantasma der Stepford Wives, der unheimlichen, soldatischen Hausfrauen, deren Lebenswerk die Aufrechterhaltung einer Fassade ist, welche die Unterwerfung ihres eigenen Körpers erst möglich macht, wird hier humorvoll aufgelöst — statt Braten und Kuchen wird hier der Phallus-bestückte Bär als totemistisches Rudiment weiblicher Machtfantasie serviert, von rot manikürten Fingernägeln zivilisiert mit Messer und Gabel zerschnitten und verspeist. Diese urbildlichen Szenen schaffen eine Welt, deren Körperlichkeit anwesend ist, doch nicht verborgen zwischen Sprühsahne und glasierten Rippchen, sondern mittendrin, in einer intimen und sorgsamen, ja vergnüglichen Verschwörung mit den Figuren und den Dingen. Die Bären in all ihrer pelzigen Opulenz verwandeln sich in freundschaftliche, sexuelle Fantasien, die als wohlwollende Hausgeister Teil der Familie werden, die Regimente der Zuwendung und Hausarbeit umkehren und sich als fürsorgliche und unterhaltsame Dienstleister an den weiblichen Figuren zeigen. Sie geben Fußmassagen, sind in inniger Umarmung und manchmal warten sie bloß zurückhaltend als Zaungast hinter dem Vorhang, sehen der Frau bei ihren Liebkosungen mit einem menschlichen Liebhaber zu.

Es ist ein Spiel mit dem weiblichen Begehren, das im Fantastischen aufgeht und doch im Körperlichen wurzelt. Der dargestellte Sex ist nicht pornografisch, im Gegenteil: Er verzichtet auf die Abbildung zugunsten der Leichtigkeit der Bewegung und einer Liebe zum Fleischwerden der Figuren in ihrem Miteinander. Doch fehlt bei all der Fröhlichkeit nicht der Boden, auf dem sie wächst, und der Schatten, den der Körper auf ihn wirft: Einige der großen Fragen feministischer Literatur und Theorie sind der Umgang mit dem kulturell gewachsenen sexuellen Begehren, das heimgesucht wird von Fantasien der eigenen Unterwerfung, von der Anziehungskraft des Überwältigt- und Beschütztwerdens, und die nach der Vereinbarkeit all dessen mit einem selbstbestimmten Leben und der Sicherung desjenigen Raums, der das eigene Imaginäre, das künstlerische Schaffen inmitten dieser Widersprüche etabliert und aufblühen lässt.

Wie der Bärenkavalier in Janeckova Walshes Arbeiten hat so auch die Geschichte der Frau, die wie in Southeys Märchen mit den Bären zu leben lernt, einen blinden Fleck, welcher auf die Frage nach weiblichem Leben und Überleben in einer patriarchalen Welt verweist: Ist die Frau freundlich, hübsch und gut frisiert, so dulden die Bären sie in ihrem Haus und schließen Freundschaft mit ihr, doch als alte, wütende Frau wird sie aus dem Bett geworfen und in den Wald gejagt. In Texas spiegelt sich dieses augenscheinliche Paradoxon von Zuneigung und Ausgeliefertsein in der seltsamen Nähe zu den Tieren: Der Cowboy ist auf die Tiere angewiesen und lebt von ihrer Tötung. So ist der Viehtreiber, der sich selbst in die abgezogenen Häute der Tiere kleidet, nicht umsonst ein Symbol der Gewaltgeschichte Nordamerikas geworden, der Kolonisierung, Verdrängung und Ermordung seiner indigenen Bevölkerungen. Er ist es, der in Iron Man nun selbst bis auf den Hut nackt in einer Kreuzigungsdarstellung zu sehen ist, wo er als erotischer Haushaltsgehilfe nicht etwa schlachtet, sondern: bügelt. Wie The Story of the Three Bears die Drohung der Strafe für das Aufbegehren gegen einen fremdbestimmten Lebensraum eingeschrieben ist, so liegt auch Janeckova Walshes magischem Realismus der Häuslichkeit etwas Bedrohliches zugrunde, in das sie ihre Figuren aber mit solcher Eindringlichkeit hüllt, dass sie darin behaglich werden.

Janeckova Walshes Bildsprache lebt vom Spiel mit den dunklen Seiten einer unbewussten Intimität, die allen Lebensformen gemeinsam ist, und etabliert darin etwas, das man ihr bei all der Leichtigkeit vielleicht nicht auf den ersten Blick zuschreiben würde: eine existentialistische Position. Doch ist es nicht die der Heldengeschichten des 20. Jahrhunderts, welche die Steppenwölfe, die einsamen Cowboys und Indianer miteinander aufführen und die das Survival als Frage nach dem blutigen Kampf gegen die Anderen beschreiben. In Janeckova Walshes Arbeit wird das Survival aus einem weiblichen Imaginären geboren, aus der psychologischen Realität des Alltags, der familiären Umgebung und ihrer bunten, fleischlichen Wirklichkeit, aus der sich die immer drängender werdenden Frage nach der Möglichkeit des menschlichen Daseins auf der Erde auf neue Weise stellt: Wie überleben wir in der Nähe zu anderen?

Ein unabkömmlicher Teil des Survival ist es auch, den Lebensraum zu gestalten, ihn zu einer freundlichen und willkommen heißenden Umgebung zu machen. Katarina Janeckova Walshe hat in Corpus Christi einen Raum geschaffen, der mehr ist als ein Zuhause. Es ist das magische Material ihrer Arbeit, das alles hier durchdringt: Sogar die Bären verlassen die Bilder, sie besiedeln nicht nur das Grundstück, auf dem die Familie lebt, sie haben sich hinausgeschlichen und bevölkern den Ort; Zäune und kleine Geschäfte. Es ist ein Lebenswerk, das eine bunte und vom Körper getragene Welt inmitten einer Umgebung voller Symbole von Herrschaft und Dominanz geschaffen hat. Und hört man Janeckova Walshe zu, wie sie über ihre Arbeit spricht, so spürt man in all der Ruhe und Freundlichkeit einen Willen, der sich darüber im Klaren ist, dass man die Sprache derjenigen Verhältnisse sprechen muss, die Gewalt auf das eigene Leben ausüben, um sie zu besiegen. Die Bären, sie werden hier jedoch nicht aus dem Haus gejagt, sondern beschworen, in einer fröhlichen und heldenhaften Geschichte des ganz und gar Alltäglichen.

ANNA GIEN, geboren 1991 in München, ist Schriftstellerin. Sie schreibt Prosa, Essays, Lyrik und eine monatliche Kolumne. Ihre Arbeit beschäft sich mit feministischer Theorie, dem pornographischen Körper und den Zusammenhängen von Gewalt und Sichtbarkeit. 2019 erschien ihr Debut Roman „M“ in Co-Autorenschaft mit Marlene Stark bei Matthes und Seitz Berlin, dessen Adaption 2021 an der Schaubühne Premiere feiert. Sie lebt und arbeitet in Berlin.

Katarina Janeckova Walshe, Dishwashing in Texas III, 2019, acrylic on canvas, 200 x 180 cm
Katarina Janeckova Walshe, Cowboy diet, 2020, Oil on canvas, 28 x 35.5 cm
Katarina Janeckova Walshe, Marriage is a Choice, 2019, acrylic on canvas, 180 x 162 cm
Katarina Janeckova Walshe, Iron Man, 2018, acrylic and oil on canvas, cotton T shirt, 193 x 274 cm
Katarina Janeckova Walshe, Let me watch over you, 2020, Acrylic on canvas, framed, 25 x 20 cm
Katarina Janeckova Walshe, Cowboy essentials, 2020, Acrylic on canvas, framed, 25 x 20 cm
Katarina Janeckova Walshe, The Lovers, 2020, oil on canvas, 142 x 91 cm
Katarina Janeckova Walshe, The Benefts of Climbing Solo, 2020 acrylic on canvas, 285 x 205 cm
Katarina Janeckova Walshe, West Texas Laundromat Fantasy 2019, acrylic on canvas, 200 x 155 cm
Katarina Janeckova Walshe, Memories and experiences, wash with care (Reversed Laundromat Fantasy), 2020, Acrylic on canvas, framed, 195 x 343 cm
Katarina Janeckova Walshe, Wringers 2020, acrylic on canvas, vintage silk, 100 x 290 cm
Katarina Janeckova Walshe, What is meant for you will never miss you (and what misses you was never meant for you), 2020, Acrylic on canvas, framed, 193 x 101 cm
Katarina Janeckova Walshe, how to handle wild woman, 2020, acrylic on canvas, 325 x 254 cm
Katarina Janeckova Walshe, how to handle wild woman, 2020, acrylic on canvas, 325 x 254 cm, detail
Katarina Janeckova Walshe, how to handle wild woman, 2020, acrylic on canvas, 325 x 254 cm, detail
Katarina Janeckova Walshe, What did you do all day baby?, 2020 acrylic on canvas, 35.5 x 28 cm
Katarina Janeckova Walshe, Quarantine lessons I, 2020, ink, pencil on paper, Unique, 30 x 25 cm
Katarina Janeckova Walshe, Dishwashing in Texas, 2020, ink, acrylic, pencil on paper and fabric, Unique, 41.91 x 35.56 cm
Katarina Janeckova Walshe, Let me take care of you, 2020, ink, pencil on paper, Unique, 44.45 x 35.56 cm
Katarina Janeckova Walshe, (The Provider) I just want to feed them all, 2020, ink, acrylic on paper, Unique, 60.96 x 45.72 cm
Katarina Janeckova Walshe, West Texas Laundromat Fantasy, 2020, ink, pencil on paper, Unique, 60.96 x 45.72 cm
Katarina Janeckova Walshe, Players, 2018, ink, on paper, Unique, 76 x 58 cm
Katarina Janeckova Walshe, How was your day Baby, 2019, ink, pencil on paper, Unique, 60.96 x 45.72 cm
Katarina Janeckova Walshe, FOCUS, 2020, ink, acrylic on paper, 35 x 27 cm
Katarina Janeckova Walshe, Men of Texas Please, 2020, ink, pencil on paper, Unique, 35.5 x 28 cm
Katarina Janeckova Walshe, FOCUS II, 2020, ink, acrylic on paper, 35 x 27 cm

videos

Katarina Janeckova Walshe, Secrets of a Happy Household
Adriano Sack meets Katarina Janeckova Walshe