DITTRICH & SCHLECHTRIEM

Jonas Wendelin

ONLY

15 Jun 2020 – 29 Aug 2020

English German

DITTRICH & SCHLECHTRIEM is pleased to present the first solo exhibition with JONAS WENDELIN (b. Düsseldorf, DE, 1985) in our gallery, titled ONLY, on view from Monday, 15 June, through Saturday, 29 August, 2020.

The installation on the first floor and gallery level is on view, in its entirety, through Saturday, June 27, after which the gallery level installation will remain open through Saturday, August 29, 2020.

The exhibition was originally scheduled to open as part of Gallery Weekend Berlin 2020. Due to the lockdown in Los Angeles, the artist could not travel to Europe and the works could not be shipped to Berlin. The show was substantially conceived in 2019.

For his first solo show ONLY at the gallery, Wendelin deconstructs the actual and symbolic context of the gallery, exposing its methodologies through a fictive architectural installation and aligning strands of his thinking into a narrative spanning from conceptual found objects to the visceral physicality of his ceramics practice. ONLY engages the public in an alternative reality, pursuing an organic futuristic narrative of idealism and leaving the viewer with hope in dystopia.

An ecology held together by stories needs people to hear them and retell them. But how do these tales disintegrate without an audience? And without civilization to know the difference between natural matter and cultural objects, how might these things take on or leave behind lives of their own? Wendelin’s question is: “When we leave or vanish, how will the dust settle? If we return, what new traces will be found?”

DITTRICH & SCHLECHTRIEM freuen sich, die erste Einzelausstellung von JONAS WENDELIN (geb. Düsseldorf, DE, 1985) in unserer Galerie zu präsentieren. Die Schau mit dem Titel ONLY wird ab Montag, dem 15. Juni bis zum 29. August zu besichtigen sein.

Die gesamte Installation im Erdgeschoss und im Ausstellungsraum im Untergeschoss ist bis Samstag, 27. Juni zu sehen. Danach wird die Installation im Ausstellungsraum noch bis Samstag, 29. August 2020 geöffnet sein.

Die Ausstellung sollte ursprünglich im Rahmen des Gallery Weekend Berlin 2020 eröffnen. Aufgrund des Lockdowns in Los Angeles konnte sowohl der Künstler als auch seine Werke nicht nach Europa reisen. Die inhaltliche Auseinandersetzung der Ausstellung wurde schon im Jahr 2019 konzipiert.

Für seine Ausstellung ONLY dekonstruiert Wendelin den tatsächlichen und symbolischen Kontext der Galerie, legt deren Methodik durch eine fiktive Architekturinstallation offen und verflicht verschiedene Stränge seines Denkens zu einer Erzählung, die von konzeptuellen gefundenen Objekten bis zur handfesten Körperlichkeit seiner Keramikpraxis reicht. Die Ausstellung ONLY bezieht die Besucher in eine alternative architektonische Realität ein, verfolgt eine organische futuristische Erzählung des Idealismus und lässt den Betrachter mit Hoffnung in der Dystopie zurück.

Ein von Geschichten zusammengehaltenes Ökosystem braucht Menschen, die sie hören und nacherzählen. Wie aber vollzieht sich die Auflösung dieser Geschichten, wenn es kein Publikum für sie gibt? Und wenn keine Zivilisation mehr den Unterschied zwischen Naturstoff und Kulturgegenstand kennt, wie könnte das Eigenleben aussehen, das diese Dinge dann womöglich annähmen oder hinterließen? Wendelin formuliert es so: „Wenn wir weggehen oder verschwinden, wie wird der Staub sich legen? Wenn wir zurückkehren, welche neuen Spuren werden wir vorfinden?“

He stages these questions in the form of a scene. The exhibition is set in a gallery concealed by broadsheets posted over its windows. These are pages of a publication commissioned and edited by the artist called THE ALLUSION, whose contributors have offered “fictions on fiction” that dissect conceits of the show while also propagating them.

THE ALLUSION is produced in collaboration with multiple artists, architects, writers, and journalists and describes an entry to this illusion of abandonment. Through the juxtaposed, overlapping, and contradicting contributions, it aims to limn perspectives examining these tools of contemporary fiction. The involvement of different voices raises the question of individual agency and opens gateways toward shaping a shared evaluation of objects and belief systems.

The inside of the exhibition suggests the aftermath of some progress-halting event. Wandering among empty workstations through the stripped gallery, one can see that files and business machines have been replaced with jars of preserved foods predating the internet. Some are from the Chernobyl era, artifacts of times shaped by disaster, and in response, by the physical limitations of bodies and of resources like these. Wendelin presents them here as readymades and as bunker decor, items that might be found in a place where survivors subsist waiting for history to restart its engine.

Dozens of organic, aqueous forms are littered around the galleries themselves. These are ceramic artworks made by Wendelin titled ONLY ONE, TWO, THREE … counting upwards in numeric evolution. Despite their raw contours and appearance of natural proliferation throughout the space, these are hand-pinched and deliberately placed sculptures. Here as thousands of years ago, they are the product of ritualistic methods, the practice of which could be thought to hold some part of the time concentrated within their making. Their abyssal lusters are the result of a chemical-induced glazing technique called raku. To achieve these, the sculptures are removed from the kiln at their peak temperature of more than 1800 degrees and placed in metal containers full of paper that combusts upon contact. The resulting carbon compounds extract otherworldly colors from the suffocated glazes. Charred remnants of paper appear in traces around the sculptures. In their virgin form they are pages from the publication pasted in the gallery windows, which have also been placed in geometric stacks throughout the exhibition to be taken.

Additionally, stored up in shelves, are customized preserves from the last decades dating back to 1945, pre-internet or -Chernobyl. These objects assemble a sentiment or timeline of technology in the early stages of our kind, to the enhancements leading up to our way of life today, with generational differences widening more than ever as it accelerates. The shift in consumption laid the foundations for our technological revolutions, elevated our consciousness to experimentation, and refocused our attention to develop increasingly complex social structures. These objects are reminders of a world prior to our human-centric sphere.

The above contains excerpts from the press text of Kevin McGarry, published in THE ALLUSION.

Jonas Wendelin currently works between Los Angeles and Berlin. His work includes performance, sculpture, installation, studies in traditional ceramics, as well as the facilitation of cultural spaces, initiating, cultivating, and directing a social vision that queries cultural abetments. Wendelin is a co- founder and director of FRAGILE, a multi-disciplinary nonprofit project for contemporary artistic practices located in Berlin. FRAGILE encompasses an exhibition and a residency space, and fosters a program of conversation, antagonism, renegotiation, and celebration. He is also a co- founder of NAVEL, a community-driven nonprofit residency, learning platform, and self-defined test site for collectivity and creative practices in downtown Los Angeles. Wendelin graduated as Hito Steyerl’s Meisterschüler from the Berlin University of the Arts and was a participant at Olafur Eliasson’s Institut für Raumexperimente (Institute for Spatial Experiments). Wendelin was an artist in residence at the American Museum Of Ceramics Art, AMOCA in Pomona, California. His work has been shown at Hamburger Bahnhof— Museum für Gegenwart, Berlin; KW Institute for Contemporary Art, Berlin; MoMA PS1, New York; Neue Nationalgalerie, Berlin; The Storefront for Art and Architecture, New York; and NAVEL, Los Angeles.

For further information on the artist and the works or to request images, please contact Nils Petersen, nils(at)dittrich-schlechtriem.com.

 

_____________

THE ALLUSION
Edition of 10,000, printed
ISBN 978-3-945180-31-0

Contributors / Analisa Teachworth, Blaine O‘Neill, Dehlia Hannah, Fiona Alison Duncan, Fritz Adamski, Hayden Dunham, Kandis Williams, Luis Ortega Govela, Mandy Harris Williams, Milos Trakilovic, Sean Monahan, Dung Tieu, Timo Feldhaus

Designer / Blaine O‘Neill

Publisher / DITTRICH & SCHLECHTRIEM, Berlin

Diese Fragen setzt er in der Ausstellung in Szene. Die Fenster der Galerie sind mit großformatigen bedruckten Seiten zugehängt, die aus einer vom Künstler herausgegebenen Publikation mit dem Titel THE ALLUSION stammen. Die Autoren, die er dafür einlud, steuerten „Fiktionen über Fiktion“ bei, die die Ideen hinter der Schau auseinandernehmen, aber auch weitertragen.

THE ALLUSION ist in Zusammenarbeit mit mehreren Künstlern, Architekten, Schriftstellern und Journalisten entstanden und beschreibt einen Einstieg in jene Illusion der Verlassenheit. Durch die nebeneinanderstehenden, sich überschneidenden und einander widersprechenden Beiträge sollen Perspektiven einer Auseinandersetzung mit diesen Werkzeugen der zeitgenössischen Fiktion entworfen werden. Die Einbeziehung verschiedener Stimmen wirft die Frage nach der individuellen Handlungsmacht auf und öffnet Wege zur Gestaltung einer gemeinsamen Bewertung von Objekten und Glaubenssystemen.

Die Szene im Inneren der Galerie wirkt, als habe ein unerwartetes Ereignis den Betrieb zum Erliegen gebracht. Die Arbeitsplätze sind verwaist, die Räumlichkeiten weitgehend leer; statt Aktenschränken und Bürogeräten finden sich Nahrungsmittel in Einmachgläsern, die älter sind als das Internet – manche stammen aus der Zeit von Tschernobyl, Artefakte, in die sich die Katastrophe und die Grenzen von Körpern und Ressourcen wie diesen in der Reaktion auf sie eingeschrieben haben. Wendelin zeigt sie hier als Readymades und Bunkerausstattung, wie sie an einem Ort zu finden sein mögen, wo Überlebende ausharren, bis das Räderwerk der Geschichte sich wieder in Bewegung setzt.

Dutzende wässrig-organischer Gestalten sind über die Räume der Galerie verteilt: Keramiken von Wendelin mit den Titeln ONLY ONE, TWO, THREE … und so weiter in numerischer Reihung. Trotz ihrer rohen Konturen und dem Anschein einer Art natürlichen Ausbreitung im Raum handelt es sich um von Hand in Form gepresste und sorgfältig angeordnete Skulpturen. Hier wie vor tausenden Jahren sind sie Früchte ritueller Verfahren, in deren Ausübung man sich etwas von der Zeit, die in ihrer Herstellung verdichtet wurde, aufgespeichert denken mag. Ihr abgründiges Schimmern verdanken sie einer durch chemische Zugaben herbeigeführten Glasurtechnik namens Raku. Dazu werden die Skulpturen dem auf eine Maximaltemperatur von über 1800 Grad erhitzten Brennofen entnommen und in Metallbehälter gelegt, die mit Papier gefüllt sind, das bei der Berührung in Flammen aufgeht. Die entstehenden Kohlenstoffverbindungen entlocken den erstickten Glasuren überirdische Farben. Spuren von verkohlten Papierschnipseln sind um die Skulpturen herum zu erkennen. In unversehrter Form waren es Seiten aus der Publikation auf den Galeriefenstern; weitere Exemplare liegen in der Ausstellung in geometrischen Stapeln zum Mitnehmen aus.

In Regalen aufgestellte scheinbar aufbewahrte individuell gestaltete Artefakte aus den letzten Jahrzehnten zurück bis 1945, aus der Zeit vor dem Internet und Tschernobyl, bieten einen Eindruck oder eine Zeitleiste der Technologie in den frühen Stadien unserer Art bis hin zu den Neuentwicklungen, die zu unserer heutigen Lebensweise führen, wobei die Generationsunterschiede mehr denn je zunehmen, je schneller sie fortschreitet. Der Wandel des Konsums hat die Grundlagen für unsere technologischen Revolutionen gelegt, unser Bewusstsein auf die Stufe des Experimentierens gehoben, die in der frühen Menschheit begann, und unsere Aufmerksamkeit bewusst auf die Entwicklung unserer immer komplexeren sozialen Strukturen ausgerichtet. Diese Objekte erinnern an eine Welt vor der unseren, in der der Mensch im Mittelpunkt steht.

Diese Ausführungen stammen von Kevin McGarry, welcher einen Pressetext für THE ALLUSION verfassen hat.

Jonas Wendelin arbeitet derzeit in Los Angeles und Berlin. Sein Werk umfasst Performances, Skulpturen, Installationen, Studien zur traditionellen Keramik sowie die Moderation kultureller Räume; er initiiert, fördert und entwickelt eine gesellschaftliche Vision, die kulturelle Routinen hinterfragt. Wendelin ist Mitbegründer und Leiter von FRAGILE, eines multidisziplinären Nonprofit-Projekts für zeitgenössische künstlerische Praxen in Berlin, das einen Ausstellungs- und ein „Artist in Residence“ für eingeladene Künstler umfasst und Gesprächen, Auseinandersetzungen, Neuverhandlungen und Festivitäten Raum gibt. Außerdem ist er Mitbegründer von NAVEL, einer gemeinschaftlich betriebenen Nonprofit-Organisation in Downtown Los Angeles, die Künstleraufenthalte ermöglicht, eine Lernplattform betreibt und sich als Testgelände für Kollektivität und kreative Praxen versteht. Wendelin war Hito Steyerls Meisterschüler an der Berliner Universität der Künste, Teilnehmer an Olafur Eliassons Institut für Raumexperimente und „Artist in Residence“ in American Museum Of Ceramics Art, AMOCA in Pomona, Kalifornien. Seine Arbeiten waren im Hamburger Bahnhof – Museum für Gegenwart, Berlin, im KW Institute for Contemporary Art, Berlin, im MoMA PS1, New York, in der Neuen Nationalgalerie, Berlin, und bei The Storefront for Art and Architecture, New York, und NAVEL, Los Angeles, zu sehen.

Für weitere Informationen zum Künstler und den Arbeiten und für Bildanfragen wenden Sie sich bitte an Nils Petersen, nils(at)dittrich-schlechtriem.com.

_____________

THE ALLUSION
Edition of 10,000, printed
ISBN 978-3-945180-31-0

Contributors / Analisa Teachworth, Blaine O‘Neill, Dehlia Hannah, Fiona Alison Duncan, Fritz Adamski, Hayden Dunham, Kandis Williams, Luis Ortega Govela, Mandy Harris Williams, Milos Trakilovic, Sean Monahan, Dung Tieu, Timo Feldhaus

Designer / Blaine O‘Neill

Publisher / DITTRICH & SCHLECHTRIEM, Berlin

ONLY
By KEVIN MCGARRY

ONLY, Jonas Wendelin’s first solo show at the gallery, is a choreography of elements exploring the notion of fiction as a technology that produces some of society’s most entrenched systems, collectively understood as reality. This runs contrary to charges fiction commonly carries as false, fabricated, or imaginary, and enduring dichotomies like fiction and fact, art and life, or narrative and documentary. It’s an ontological path well worn with sophomoric musings as well as with frank epiphanies in which the costuming of a moment in time is suddenly understood as its naked truth.

An ecology held together by stories needs people to hear them and retell them. But how do these tales disintegrate without an audience? And without civilization to know the difference between natural matter and cultural objects, how might these things take on or leave behind lives of their own? Wendelin’s question is: “When we leave or vanish, how will the dust settle? If we return, what new traces will be found?”

ONLY
Von KEVIN MCGARRY

ONLY, Jonas Wendelins erste Einzelausstellung in der Galerie, ist eine Choreografie von Elementen, in der er der Vorstellung von Fiktion als einer Technologie zur Verfertigung verschiedener in der Gesellschaft besonders fest verwurzelter Systeme nachgeht, die zusammen als Wirklichkeit gelten. So stellt er verbreitete Auffassungen von Fiktion als unwahr, erfunden oder imaginär und hartnäckige Dichotomien wie die von Fiktion und Tatsache, von Kunst und Leben, von erzählender und dokumentarischer Form in Frage. Damit beschreitet er einen ausgetretenen ontologischen Pfad, der von neunmalklugen Grübeleien, aber auch von blitzartigen Erleuchtungen gesäumt ist, in denen die Maskierung eines bestimmten Augenblicks sich als seine nackte Wahrheit enthüllt.

Ein von Geschichten zusammengehaltenes Ökosystem braucht Menschen, die sie hören und nacherzählen. Wie aber vollzieht sich die Auflösung dieser Geschichten, wenn es kein Publikum für sie gibt? Und wenn keine Zivilisation mehr den Unterschied zwischen Naturstoff und Kulturgegenstand kennt, wie könnte das Eigenleben aussehen, das diese Dinge dann womöglich annähmen oder hinterließen? Wendelin formuliert es so: „Wenn wir weggehen oder verschwinden, wie wird der Staub sich legen? Wenn wir zurückkehren, welche neuen Spuren werden wir vorfinden?“


He stages these questions in the form of a scene. The exhibition is set in a gallery concealed by broadsheets posted over its windows. These are pages of a publication commissioned and edited by the artist called The Allusion, whose contributors have offered “fictions on fiction” that dissect conceits of the show while also propagating them. The inside of the exhibition suggests the aftermath of some progress-halting event. Wandering among empty workstations through the stripped gallery, one can see that files and business machines have been replaced with jars of preserved foods predating the internet. Some are from the Chernobyl era, artifacts of times shaped by disaster, and in response, by the physical limitations of bodies and of resources like these. Wendelin presents them here as readymades and as bunker decor, items that might be found in a place where survivors subsist waiting for history to restart its engine.

Dozens of organic, aqueous forms are littered around the galleries themselves. These are ceramic artworks made by Wendelin titled ONLY ONE, TWO, THREE …counting upwards in numeric evolution. Despite their raw contours and appearance of natural proliferation throughout the space, these are hand-pinched and deliberately placed sculptures. Here as thousands of years ago, they are the product of ritualistic methods, the practice of which could be thought to hold some part of the time concentrated within their making. Their abyssal lusters are the result of a chemical-induced glazing technique called raku. To achieve these, the sculptures are removed from the kiln at their peak temperature of more than 1800 degrees and placed in metal containers full of paper that combusts upon contact. The resulting carbon compounds extract otherworldly colors from the suffocated glazes. Charred remnants of paper appear in traces around the sculptures. In their virgin form they are pages from the publication pasted in the gallery windows, which have also been placed in geometric stacks throughout the exhibition to be taken.

In the archive of the gallery, there are three works by other artists on view: one from the preceding show, one from a show that was cancelled, and another from the show that will follow Wendelin’s. These artifacts from other stories with their own linearities hint at an ambiguous temporal frame apart from the vacuum portrayed by the rest of the scene within the gallery. Looming larger is of course the actual seismic event of the pandemic, and the exhibition’s place in time within a historically significant period that has unfolded throughout the gestation of this body of work and now its delayed presentation.

Finally, perceptible or not, dust has been strewn over surfaces throughout the gallery and left to settle as a constant physical memory of how matter dissipates and accumulates over time. Dust assumes the shape of whatever surface it settles upon; in different states and quantities, dust hides or adds definition to the objects and places of the world.

As ambiguities within the show compound—not only those between fact and fiction, but also nature and culture—the story that comes to life moves beyond surface appearances of atrophy and dystopia, towards constructive possibilities of regeneration and discovery, of change not as a metric for progress but a symptom of it.


Diese Fragen setzt er in der Ausstellung in Szene. Die Fenster der Galerie sind mit großformatigen bedruckten Seiten zugehängt, die aus einer vom Künstler herausgegebenen Publikation mit dem TitelThe Allusionstammen. Die Autoren, die er dafür einlud, steuerten „Fiktionen über Fiktion“ bei, die die Ideen hinter der Schau auseinandernehmen, aber auch weitertragen. Die Szene im Inneren der Galerie wirkt, als habe ein unerwartetes Ereignis den Betrieb zum Erliegen gebracht. Die Arbeitsplätze sind verwaist, die Räumlichkeiten weitgehend leer; statt Aktenschränken und Bürogeräten finden sich Nahrungsmittel in Einmachgläsern, die älter sind als das Internet – manche stammen aus der Zeit von Tschernobyl, Artefakte, in die sich die Katastrophe und die Grenzen von Körpern und Ressourcen wie diesen in der Reaktion auf sie eingeschrieben haben. Wendelin zeigt sie hier als Readymades und Bunkerausstattung, wie sie an einem Ort zu finden sein mögen, wo Überlebende ausharren, bis das Räderwerk der Geschichte sich wieder in Bewegung setzt.

Dutzende wässrig-organischer Gestalten sind über die Räume der Galerie verteilt: Keramiken von Wendelin mit den Titeln ONLY ONE, TWO, THREE …und so weiter in numerischer Reihung. Trotz ihrer rohen Konturen und dem Anschein einer Art natürlichen Ausbreitung im Raum handelt es sich um von Hand in Form gepresste und sorgfältig angeordnete Skulpturen. Hier wie vor tausenden Jahren sind sie Früchte ritueller Verfahren, in deren Ausübung man sich etwas von der Zeit, die in ihrer Herstellung verdichtet wurde, aufgespeichert denken mag. Ihr abgründiges Schimmern verdanken sie einer durch chemische Zugaben herbeigeführten Glasurtechnik namens Raku. Dazu werden die Skulpturen dem auf eine Maximaltemperatur von über 1800 Grad erhitzten Brennofen entnommen und in Metallbehälter gelegt, die mit Papier gefüllt sind, das bei der Berührung in Flammen aufgeht. Die entstehenden Kohlenstoffverbindungen entlocken den erstickten Glasuren überirdische Farben. Spuren von verkohlten Papierschnipseln sind um die Skulpturen herum zu erkennen. In unversehrter Form waren es Seiten aus der Publikation auf den Galeriefenstern; weitere Exemplare liegen in der Ausstellung in geometrischen Stapeln zum Mitnehmen aus.

Im Archiv der Galerie sind drei Arbeiten anderer Künstler zu sehen: eine aus der vorangegangenen, eine aus einer abgesagten und eine aus der auf Wendelins Schau folgenden Ausstellung. Diese Artefakte aus anderen Geschichten mit ihren eigenen Linearitäten deuten einen mehrdeutigen Zeitrahmen jenseits der von der übrigen Szenerie in der Galerie veranschaulichten Leere an. Unvermeidlich drängt der Gedanke an die Pandemie sich auf, die die Welt zur Zeit erbeben lässt, und an den zeitlichen Ort der Ausstellung in der Phase einer historischen Erschütterung, die die Entstehung dieser Gruppe von Arbeiten und nun ihre verzögerte Ausstellung begleitete.

Als letztes Element wurden Oberflächen in der ganzen Galerie mit Staub bestreut, der sich auf ihnen niedergelassen hat und so, ob sichtbar oder nicht, ein beständiges stoffliches Gedächtnis des fortwährenden Zerfalls der Materie und ihrer Anhäufung bildet. Staub nimmt die Gestalt an, auf der er zur Ruhe kommt; in verschiedenen Zustandsformen und Mengen verwischt er die Umrisse der Dinge und Orte dieser Welt oder lässt sie hervortreten.

In den sich gegenseitig verstärkenden Mehrdeutigkeiten der Ausstellung – nicht nur zwischen Fakt und Fiktion, sondern auch zwischen Natur und Kultur – erwacht eine Geschichte zum Leben, die den Augenschein von Ödnis und Dystopie hinter sich lässt, um konstruktive Möglichkeiten von Erneuerung und Entdeckung zu entwerfen: von Veränderung nicht als Maß, sondern als Kennzeichen des Fortschritts.

ONLY
By M.D.

The first cultural device was probably a recipient … Many theorizers feel that the earliest cultural inventions must have been a container to hold gathered products and some kind of sling or net carrier.
Ursula K. Le Guin

Virginia Woolf’s working notes for a book that will later be published as Three Guineascontain the idea of a novel kind of “glossary,” a collection of words designed to reconceive language or invent it afresh in order to allow a fundamentally different, forgotten, overlooked history to be told. One entry in this register is “heroism,” rewritten as “botulism.” The term for a hero, meanwhile, is resignified in Woolf’s glossary into the word “bottle.” The latter, in turn, is understood not only in its narrow contemporary meaning but rather in its older etymological sense, as a general “container” or, as the science fiction writer Ursula K. Le Guin puts it decades later, “a thing that holds something else.” Not unlike her, Jonas Wendelin in his practice raises the question of the fictions and narratives that underlie societies and constitute realities. Which materials are our stories made of, where do they grow compact, where do they become porous or fragile? Where are they vital enough for someone to exist in them; where do they need to be destabilized so they do not suffocate those who inhabit them?

ONLY
Von M.D.

The first cultural device was probably a recipient. … Many theorizers feel that the earliest cultural inventions must have been a container to hold gathered products and some kind of sling or net carrier.
Ursula K. Le Guin

In Virginia Woolfs Arbeitsnotizen zu dem Buch, das später als Drei Guineen(Three Guineas) veröffentlicht wird, findet sich die Idee eines neuartigen Glossars (glossary). Dieses Wörterverzeichnis sollte Sprache umkonzipieren oder neu erfinden, um eine grundlegend andere, vergessene, übersehene Geschichte erzählbar zu machen. Einer der Einträge in diesem Register ist „heroism“,umgeschrieben als „botulism“. Der Begriff für Held ist in Woolfs Wörterbuch umkonzipiert als das Wort „bottle“. Dabei ist das Wort „bottle“nicht nur im Sinne einer Flasche verstanden, sondern vielmehr im älteren Sinne der etymologischen Bedeutung, eines generellen Behälters („container“) oder, wie es die Science-Fiction-Autorin Ursula K. Le Guin Jahrzehnte später ausdrückt, „a thing that holds something else“. Ähnlich wie sie stellt Jonas Wendelin in seiner Arbeitsweise die Frage nach den Fiktionen und Narrativen, die Gemeinschaften zugrunde liegen und Wirklichkeiten konstituieren. Danach, aus welchem Material unsere Geschichten sind, wo sie sich verdichten, porös oder fragil werden. Wo sie lebendig genug sind, damit man in ihnen existieren, oder instabil gemacht werden müssen, damit man atmen kann.


This practice is based on a structure that does not just narrate; it also listens. A listener whose work grows not so much out of objects but rather out of stories. The latter materialize on the surfaces of Wendelin’s works, where they interact in turn with the various beholders or protagonists. In his creative practice, and not only that of storytelling and conversation, the object can accordingly be experienced only in relation to other objects and subjects, set in spaces created specifically for the occasion; no object can be thought in isolation from its environment.

The way narrative functions in Wendelin’s art is reminiscent of Le Guin’s Carrier Bag Theory of Fiction—a critique of traditional research methodology and analysis of conventional narratives that exclude or marginalize multiplicity and complexity. In her essay, the author not only probes the question of which stories are passed on, she also examines the form of those stories and their materiality. Le Guin takes the conventional notion that all narrative springs from the instant when the male hero sets out into the world, slays an animal, and carries it back into the cave to his family waiting around the fire. She reimagines it to develop her theory of a narration that, in its own way, becomes a container for words and meanings. The history of humankind, technology, and aesthetics coalesce in Le Guin to form a single narrative. Not unlike Jonas Wendelin’s practice, she asks how else we might tell the story—and how those stories might gather us.

Le Guin’s essay opens with a discussion of gender relations among the humans of the Paleolithic and Neolithic. She describes the average life of prehistoric man as one in which gathering was the primary activity and not hunting, as many have believed. Woven into her description is the hypothesis that the first cultural tool used by humans was a container: something that allowed them to collect things and store them away. An object that makes both thinking about a tomorrow and remembering a past possible by preserving, transmitting, and preparing.

Jonas Wendelin conceives of the basic structure of the exhibition—the gallery space itself—as a container that in turn harbors numerous other forms. That is why he uncovers the gallery’s storage sites and with them the archive of works by other artists who have had and will have exhibitions before and after his own. The works are visible thanks to movable walls, and by framing our place within the gallery, they anchor us in the “now” of a concrete exhibition whose ramifications are projected through the prisms of a “yesterday” and a “tomorrow.” As though in an echo chamber, the many voices of other storytellers come together and weave into each other.

The gallery’s windows figure as a sort of membrane: lined with printed matter, they shield the interior from view while also unlocking multiple fictional spaces in the stories by various writers and artists we read on the paper, all of which grapple with questions of fiction. The gallery itself is populated by diverse objects: a large number of ceramic pieces as well as preserves of various sizes, some of them dating back to as far as the mid-twentieth century, which appear to have survived the decades intact, their contents unspoiled. In their function and potential use, they encode not only the concern with a future but also the preemption of a possibly catastrophic “tomorrow.” Yet their very existence in the exhibition space conversely indicates that this same catastrophe has failed to materialize: the glass jars are full, testifying to a projected rather than real hunger. Half found objects, half embedded in the larger whole of the exhibition, they are untimely “companions”—based on their dates of manufacture, the preserves were prepared before the past century’s disasters and major paradigm shifts: before Chernobyl, before the internet, before 9/11. They are both products of their time and anticipations of a future in which no one would open and consume them.

The ceramic objects set out throughout the exhibition space seem to negotiate the question of nature versus culture on their surfaces: they might be organic detritus or the imagined vertebrae of as yet unknown living beings. At the same time, they are potentially available for use, implements that form part of an encompassing ceremonial complex that would involve both the visitors and the artist. Are these objects the remnants of a ritual, were they specifically created to be put to use in a performance that is still to come? The room does not tell us. Their contours and outlines are limned by a layer of dust that—bodiless in itself—paradoxically lends visibility to things by covering them.

The smallest units of Wendelin’s sculptural oeuvre, like the ceramics, are nodes in a network of interrelations that extends into larger spaces and containers for other creative practices and authors. A cofounder of nonprofits including Navel in Los Angeles and Fragile in Berlin, he establishes structures that defy a dominant narrative of artistic practice. This momentum of narrative elusiveness and polyphony suggests the political aspect of an art that refuses to instate a center or hierarchy. The associated politics of space-making are not driven by a dominant curatorial agenda, instead opening up a forum for delicate and fragmented voices that gather in this format. The social architectures the artist designs accommodate these protagonists like a stage or shelter in which complex stories can be told and heard.

Jonas Wendelin’s practice constructs the exhibition space as a possible world, fictionalizing existing realities to scrutinize an alternative system in which other relations are possible. His work traces the contours of a different potential narrative and how other agents might retell and refashion it.

Dieser Arbeitsweise liegt eine Struktur zugrunde, die nicht nur erzählt, sondern auch zuhört. Ein Zuhörer, dessen Arbeit weniger aus Objekten als aus Geschichten entsteht. Diese materialisieren sich und treten dann an den Oberflächen von Wendelins Arbeiten wiederum mit den unterschiedlichen RezipientInnen, ProtaginistInnen in Austausch. In seiner künstlerischen Praxis, nicht nur des Erzählens und der Konversation, ist somit das Objekt immer nur in Bezug zu anderen Objekten und Subjekten in eigens dafür geschaffenen Räumen erfahrbar und nicht isoliert von seiner Umgebung zu denken.

Dabei erinnert die Funktionsweise der Narration in Wendelins Kunst an Le Guins Carrier Bag Theory of Fiction– eine Kritik an traditioneller Forschungsmethodik und Analyse konventioneller Narrationen, die Vielschichtiges und Kompliziertes ausschließen oder marginalisieren. In ihrem Essay untersucht die Autorin dabei nicht nur, welche Geschichten überliefert werden, sondern auch die Form dieser Geschichten selbst und ihre Materialität. Die konventionelle Vorstellung, dass der Ursprung aller Narrationen der Moment ist, in dem der männliche Held in die Welt hinausgeht, ein Tier erlegt und dieses zurück in die Höhle zu seiner am Feuer wartenden Familie bringt, rekonzipiert Le Guin. Davon ausgehend entwickelt sie ihre Theorie einer Narration, die selbst zu einem Behälter für Worte und Bedeutung wird. Menschheitsgeschichte, Technologie und Ästhetik überlagern sich für Le Guin in einer einzigen Erzählung. Sie stellt – ähnlich wie Jonas Wendelin in seiner Praxis – die Frage, wie wir sonst erzählen würden und wie diese Geschichten uns sammeln würden.

Le Guins Essay beginnt mit einer Erklärung des Geschlechterverhältnisses der Menschen der Alt- und Jungsteinzeit. Sie beschreibt das durchschnittliche Leben eines Urmenschen als eines, das zunächst im Sammeln bestand, nicht im Jagen, wie viele angenommen haben. Als Teil dieser Beschreibung stellt sie die Theorie auf, dass das erste kulturelle Werkzeug, das von Menschen benutzt wurde, ein Behälter war; etwas, das es ermöglicht, Dinge zu sammeln und zu verstauen. Ein Objekt, das sowohl das Nachdenken über ein Morgen als auch die Erinnerung an eine Vergangenheit ermöglicht, weil es aufbewahrt, überliefert und vorbereitet.

Die grundlegende Struktur der Ausstellung – den Galerieraum selbst – entwirft Jonas Wendelin als Behälter, der wiederum zahlreiche andere Formen beherbergt. So sind die Aufbewahrungsorte der Galerie offengelegt und mit ihr das Archiv von Werken anderer KünstlerInnen, die jeweils Ausstellungen vor und nach dieser gehabt haben und noch haben werden. Die Arbeiten sind einsehbar über herausziehbare Wände und in ihnen verortet stehen wir im „Jetzt“ einer konkreten Ausstellung, deren Zusammenhänge entworfen werden über ein „Gestern“ und ein „Morgen“. Wie in einem Echoraum treffen hier die vielen Stimmen anderer Geschichtenerzähler aufeinander und überlagern sich.

Die Fenster der Galerie werden dabei ähnlich einer Membran gedacht und mit Zeitung verkleidet und so vor Blicken abgeschirmt. Zugleich eröffnen sie multiple fiktionale Räume in den Geschichten von unterschiedlichen AutorInnen und KünstlerInnen, die wir auf dem Papier lesen und die sich durchgehend mit Fragen der Fiktion auseinandersetzen. Das Innere des Galerieraum selbst wird von unterschiedlichen Objekten bevölkert, zum einen von zahlreichen Keramiken, zum anderen von verschieden großen Konserven, die teilweise bis zur Mitte des letzten Jahrhunderts zurückgehen und befüllt und scheinbar unbeschadet die letzten Jahrzehnte überdauert haben. Ihnen ist in ihrer Funktions- und Gebrauchsweise nicht nur das Nachdenken über eine Zukunft eingeschrieben, sondern auch die Antizipation eines möglicherweise katastrophalen „Morgen“. Ihre bloße Existenz im Ausstellungsraum deutet jedoch auch auf genau das Ausbleiben dieser Katastrophe hin, sind die Gläser doch gut gefüllt und zeugen eher von einem entworfenen als einem realen Hunger. Zwischen gefundenem Objekt und seiner Einbettung in den größeren Zusammenhang der Ausstellung sind sie unzeitige „companions“ – ihrem Entstehungsdatum nach sind die Konserven vor den Katastrophen und großen Paradigmenwechseln des letzten Jahrhunderts eingemacht worden: vor Tschernobyl, vor dem Internet, vor 9/11. Sie sind zugleich ein Produkt ihrer Zeit und eine Vorwegnahme einer Zukunft, in der sie nicht geöffnet und verzehrt wurden.

Die im Ausstellungsraum verteilten Keramikobjekte scheinen auf ihrer Oberfläche die Frage zwischen Natürlichen und Kulturellen zu verhandeln, wirken sie doch wie organisch gewachsene Fundstücke oder imaginierte Wirbelknochen uns noch nicht bekannter Lebewesen. Gleichzeitig scheinen sie als potentielle Gebrauchsobjekte in einem größeren zeremoniellen Zusammenhang zu stehen, der zugleich BesucherInnen wie auch Künstler mit einbezieht. Ob diese Objekte dabei Überbleibsel eines Rituals sind oder dafür geschaffen wurden, während einer noch in der Zukunft liegenden Performance einbezogen zu werden, lässt der Raum offen. Konturen und Umrisse zeichnen sich durch eine Schicht Staub ab, der – selbst körperlos – paradoxerweise durch das Bedecken der Dinge ihnen Sichtbarkeit verleiht.

Von den kleinsten Einheiten von Wendelins skulpturalem Werk wie den Keramiken geht ein Netz von Bezügen aus, die größere Räume und Behälter für andere künstlerische Praktiken und AutorInnen umfassen. Als Mitbegründer von Nonprofit-Institutionen wie Navel in Los Angeles und Fragile in Berlin schafft er Strukturen, die sich einer dominanten Narration von künstlerischer Praxis entgegenstellen. Dieses Moment des narrativen Entzugs und der Polyphonie verweist auf den politischen Aspekt einer Kunst, die sich weigert, ein Zentrum oder eine Hierarchie herzustellen. Die Politiken des space-makingsind dabei nicht von einer dominanten kuratorischen Agenda getrieben, sondern eröffnen ein Forum für Stimmen, die kleinteilig und fragmentiert in diesem Format zusammenkommen. In den sozialen Architekturen, die der Künstler entwirft, finden diese Protagonisten ihren Platz wie auf einer Bühne oder in einem Schutzraum, wo nun komplexe Geschichten erzählt werden und Gehör finden.

Jonas Wendelins Praxis konstruiert den Ausstellungsraum als eine mögliche Welt und untersucht durch die Fiktionalisierung von bestehenden Wirklichkeiten ein alternatives System, in dem andere Relationen möglich sind. Nachgezeichnet werden dabei die Konturen einer anderen möglichen Narration und wie diese von anderen AkteurInnen weiter- und anders erzählt werden kann.

Back to Exhibitions